how we create the best of meat without the worst of meat

 

THE SCIENTIST

In 2011, our Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder Gabor Forgacs invented a technology with the potential to change meat production forever. After presenting – and eating – the world’s first cultivated meat prototype, Gabor, whose last company pioneered the concept of 3D bioprinting, assembled a team of some of the top scientists and tissue engineers in the world to tackle the problem of manufacturing a scalable supply of real pork.

 

THE BOTTLENECK

Along with his partner in crime and son Andras, Gabor made incredible advances in the field, but paused their work on food when they hit a cost barrier—the product would not be commercially viable at a cost of thousands of dollars a pound. The company shifted its primary focus to materials, but they didn’t give up on their dream of bringing cultivated meat to the world. They approached Gabor’s long-time colleague Anthony Atala, the Director of the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, to leverage his expertise in tissue engineering as they continued to hunt for a solution.

 

THE FARMER

When Gabor met Niya, she was the CEO of ComCrop, a Singapore-based vegetable company using hydroponics to grow vegetables in the middle of cities. Access to high quality fresh produce in urban environments is scarce, and 50% is wasted in transit— having the ability to grow vegetables on rooftops without soil and pesticides could solve that. In order to be successful, though, the key problem to overcome is density: grow as many leafy greens and herbs in as small an area as possible.

 

THE LIGHTBULB MOMENT

As Niya learned more and more, she realized that the field of cultivated meat was a lot like hydroponic farming— instead of produce without soil, it was meat without the animal. Her eyes lit up, her wheels started turning, and she realized that applying the same approaches she had honed with ComCrop could be extremely relevant for the success of creating pork without the pig. Profitability wasn’t about doing tissue engineering much bigger; it was about solving the same density problem— more meat with less feedstock in less space.

 

THE INNOVATION: A Hydroponic System for Pork

Within a year of beginning their collaboration, Gabor and Niya innovated on a new technique to grow a “hydroponic system” for pork, integrating powerful concepts both from tissue engineering and farming, and shortly after received the first patent in the cultivated meat space to do just that. Since then, they have gone on to raise funding from top investors and secure partnerships with the top food companies in the space as they march toward their mission of scalable and cost-effective source of meat.

 

THE SCIENTIST

In 2011, our Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder Gabor Forgacs invented a technology with the potential to change meat production forever. After presenting – and eating – the world’s first cultivated meat prototype, Gabor, whose last company pioneered the concept of 3D bioprinting, assembled a team of some of the top scientists and tissue engineers in the world to tackle the problem of manufacturing a scalable supply of real pork.

 

THE BOTTLENECK

Along with his partner in crime and son Andras, Gabor made incredible advances in the field, but paused their work on food when they hit a cost barrier—the product would not be commercially viable at a cost of thousands of dollars a pound. The company shifted its primary focus to materials, but they didn’t give up on their dream of bringing cultivated meat to the world. They approached Gabor’s long-time colleague Anthony Atala, the Director of the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, to leverage his expertise in tissue engineering as they continued to hunt for a solution.

 

THE FARMER

When Gabor met Niya, she was the CEO of ComCrop, a Singapore-based vegetable company using hydroponics to grow vegetables in the middle of cities. Access to high quality fresh produce in urban environments is scarce, and 50% is wasted in transit— having the ability to grow vegetables on rooftops without soil and pesticides could solve that. In order to be successful, though, the key problem to overcome is density: grow as many leafy greens and herbs in as small an area as possible.

 

THE LIGHTBULB MOMENT

As Niya learned more and more, she realized that the field of cultivated meat was a lot like hydroponic farming— instead of produce without soil, it was meat without the animal. Her eyes lit up, her wheels started turning, and she realized that applying the same approaches she had honed with ComCrop could be extremely relevant for the success of creating pork without the pig. Profitability wasn’t about doing tissue engineering much bigger; it was about solving the same density problem— more meat with less feedstock in less space.

 

THE INNOVATION: A Hydroponic System for Pork

Within a year of beginning their collaboration, Gabor and Niya innovated on a new technique to grow a “hydroponic system” for pork, integrating powerful concepts both from tissue engineering and farming, and shortly after received the first patent in the cultivated meat space to do just that. Since then, they have gone on to raise funding from top investors and secure partnerships with the top food companies in the space as they march toward their mission of scalable and cost-effective source of meat.

team culture

Team_01
bryan
Team_03
sacha
Team_05

You never feel judged for any idea that you have so you can think really far out there without fear that it will be thought of as weird or bad. It creates a safety net that permits innovative thinking.

David, Bioprocess

At Fork & Good, we strive to create an environment where everyone is heard and respected. We do have very specific milestones but there’s always an openness to new ideas to solve problems

Bryan, Cell Line

At F&G values are practiced, not just professed. The culture of the company is almost more important than what we are trying to do and this is the foundation to having a good team that will stick together

Fran, Media

There is one shared mission here that we all care deeply about, and we are all willing to do whatever is necessary to achieve it. The mission goes beyond a common goal– it’s a huge problem that everyone on the team cares about on a visceral level

Sacha, Business

I love the collaborative atmosphere at Fork & Good. Everyone works together to build each other up. There are no dumb questions ….and someone’s always got your back if you need help

Aidan, Analytics

good nurtured meat for good natured people

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Are you excited about the future of meat? We're always looking for talented people who will be the farmers of tomorrow.

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